ENGLISH EXPO XXXIII

    English Expo XXXIII will be held as a hybrid competition
(both in person and virtually) on
February 25, 2023.

Contest Descriptions

Note:  Contest Letters have been reassigned so that they are now grouped by skill.   Please check carefully to ensure students are signed up for the correct contest.

A.        Posters:  Displayed and explained on-site but prepared in advance and submitted electronically before the competition, the poster must promote some aspect of English language arts and can be no larger than 3’ x 4’.  The student explains his/her poster to a judge.  The oral presentation/interview is part of the final score.  Explanations may not exceed one minute.  This contest is held during Round I, and the entrant MUST be present to explain the work. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR ANY OTHER CONTEST IN ROUND I.

 

B.   Book Cover:  Displayed and explained on-site but prepared in advance and submitted electronically before the competition, Students design an original book cover for one of the five titles on this year’s book list.  Students must read or research the book.  The total book cover cannot exceed 8 1/2” x 14” in size.  Covers developed by computer graphics must be drawn with graphics software, not scanned as a copy.  At Expo, students explain their covers to a judge in one minute or less.  The presentation/interview is part of the score.  This contest is held during Round II, and the entrant MUST be present to compete. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR ANY OTHER CONTEST IN ROUND II.

C.  Children’s Book:  Prepared in advance and submitted electronically before the competition, students write an original book designed for children in primary or elementary grades.  Art and copy must be the student’s original work.  The book must be a minimum of six pages and a maximum of twenty pages.  The student explains his/her book to a judge.  The presentation/interview should not exceed two minutes and is part of the final score.  This contest will take place in Round I, and students MUST be present to participate.  DO NOT SIGN UP FOR ANY OTHER CONTEST IN ROUND I.

 

D.  Photographic Essay:  Prepared in advance and submitted electronically before the competition, students mount three to five related pictures (color or black and white) on a poster not to exceed 3’ x 4’ or as a PowerPoint slide.  In addition, the student must write up to 100 words describing the photos, expressing creativity, or otherwise enhancing the photos for the judge’s view.  The student will explain his/her photos and writing to a judge.  The presentation/interview should not exceed two minutes and is part of the final score.  This contest will take place in Round II, and students MUST be present to participate.  DO NOT SIGN UP FOR ANY OTHER CONTEST IN ROUND II.

 

E.  Written Presentation:  The student creates 3 sample pieces from a prompt during the contest time. Using D’Nealian or Zaner Bloser, students will create one sample in manuscript print, one in cursive writing, and one in Blackletter-style calligraphy. All must be original and personally created without electronic support or enhancement. In addition, write up to 100 words expressing which form best suits the sample writing. This contest will take place in Round II.  Sample alphabets are available in the Guidebook.

 

F.  Business Letters:  Students write a business letter(s) from information provided.  Standard business letter format is used.  Judges will look for consistency in format.

G.  Social Notes:  Students write at least two different social note(s) from information provided.  Possible types include a thank you, sympathy note, invitation, letter of acceptance, etc.

H. Poetry:  From a prompt, which may be music, video, art, or other stimulus, students write at least eight lines of verse.

I.  Prose:  Students write a descriptive paragraph in odd years or a persuasive essay in even years from given information.

J.  Personal Narrative:  From several prompts, students choose one and write about a personal experience.

K.  Short Story- Fantasy:  Students write a short story in the fantasy genre using a given set of characters, setting, and conflict.

L.  Short Story- Teen Life:  Students write a short story in the teen life genre using a given set of characters, setting, and conflict.

M.  Team Dialogue Writing:  From a given situation, students write dialogue to complete a story in play-type format.  Different scenarios are provided.  Students write in teams of two for this event.  It is important that advisors indicate on the registration form which students are paired, so that they may be placed in the same room for competition.

N.  Technical Writing:  From a given set of scientific and/or technical facts, students write a piece of prose, which incorporates the necessary details in a clear, concise manner. 

O.  Literature:  Multiple choice test based on the appropriate division’s reading list of the five books for this year’s competition.  Essays may be used as tiebreakers.

P.  Listening:  Multiple choice test over three to five different oral selections, which may include a television tape of a newscast, storytelling, poetry, instructions, etc.  No notetaking is allowed.

Q.  Proofreading:  Multiple choice test over grammar, punctuation, parts of speech, spelling, editing, capitalization, analogies, synonyms, antonyms, and other techniques for demonstrating knowledge.

R.  Vocabulary:  Multiple choice test over vocabulary words both in context and in isolation.  The test may include analogies, synonyms, antonyms, and other techniques for demonstrating knowledge.

 

 

NOTE:  STUDENTS CAN ONLY PARTICIPATE IN ONE SPEAKING CONTEST

 

S.  Storytelling- Original:  Students tell original stories which they have created to a judge(s) in the room.  Stories may not exceed five minutes in length.  No costumes, props, set, make-up, or furniture, except a single chair, may be used in telling the story.  While words from other cultures may be used, the majority of the story must be told in English.  Students can only participate in ONE speaking contest. 

 

T.  Storytelling- Traditional:  Students tell traditional stories which they have learned to a judge(s) in the room.  Stories may not exceed five minutes in length. No costumes, props, set, make-up, or furniture, except a single chair, may be used in telling the story. While words from other cultures may be used, the majority of the story must be told in English.  Students can only participate in ONE speaking contest.

 

 

U.  Informative Speaking:  Students present original speeches of no longer than five minutes on a topic prepared in advance.  Students are to incorporate visual aids (posters, easels, non-living objects, etc.) into their speeches, which are submitted electronically before the competition.  Computers and other electronic aids are not permitted.  Notes are limited to one 3” x 5” index card.  Students can only participate in ONE speaking contest.

 

V.  Declamation:  Students memorize and deliver a speech given originally by a public figure at a public occasion.  Minimum time: two minutes and maximum time: five minutes. Students can only participate in ONE speaking contest.

 

W.  Poetry Recitation:  Students memorize and orally deliver published poems by recognized poets.  Poems may be either narrative or lyric.  Several poems may be combined if an introduction presents the theme.  Students may NOT recite their own, original poetry.  Minimum time: two minutes and maximum time: five minutes.  Students can only participate in ONE speaking contest.

X.  Shakespearean Monologue:  This contest requires students to memorize speech(es) from a single character in a play by Shakespeare, state the name of play, act number, scene number, and line numbers, and present a copy of speech to one judge. Judging is on memorization and pace; developing role into a distinct, believable character; understanding the emotional and intellectual context of the piece; scene honesty and believability; blocking; projection; enunciation; preparation; and effectiveness of the scene. Presentations must between one and a half minutes and five minutes long and must be 40 lines or more from the play.  No costumes, props, set, make-up, or furniture, except a single chair, may be used in doing the monologue. Text from more than one speech must be indicated both during the speech and on the paper. Students can only participate in ONE speaking contest.